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What is Oxidative Stress?

guy screaming“Oxidative stress is essentially an imbalance between the production of free radicals and the ability of the body to counteract or detoxify their harmful effects through neutralization by antioxidants.”

~ Dr. Ananya Mandal, MD

Oxidative stress will make you tired, fat, sick, and old.

Oxidative stress leads to:

  1. many pathophysiological conditions in the body
  2. neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease
  3. gene mutations and cancers
  4. chronic fatigue syndrome
  5. fragile X syndrome
  6. heart and blood vessel disorders
  7. atherosclerosis
  8. heart failure
  9. heart attack
  10. inflammatory diseases

woman eating fruitsSo, how do we prevent oxidative stress?

  1. Make sure you are eating properly, which should include whole foods such as whole fruits, whole vegetables, lean meats, and whole grains. 
  2. The proper amount of whole foods will also provide your body with the proper antioxidants needed to reduce free radicals. Some specific antioxidants are green tea, raspberries, citrus, berries, onions, broccoli, and olive oil.
  3. Strength training
  4. Martial arts
  5. Meditation
  6. Laughing

10 Ways You Could Be Sabotaging Your Efforts to a Leaner Body – Start the New Year Right!

  1. Not enough protein: Amino acids are the building blocks of protein, protein builds muscle, muscle burns fat. . .
  2. The wrong kind of carbohydrate: Stick with complex carb options for the majority of your day. These can include potatoes, rice, oatmeal, wheat breads and pastas, vegetables, some fruits and beans.
  3. Knowing when to eat simple carbs: 30 minutes after training and no other time before or after. You want to keep insulin/blood sugar levels steady for the remainder of your day.
  4. Reducing or eliminating fats: Fats play a vital role in not only energy production and fat metabolism, but also in hormone regulation especially during dieting.Be sure to include some fats into your eating plan such as whole eggs, avocado, nuts (almonds and walnuts), natural peanut and almond butter and olive oil.
  5. Not eating enough, period: The trick is to eat enough for energy, training and the building of muscle and that’s it!
  6. Not eating enough green: Veggies are a great way to fill your stomach with a healthy option rather than binge on unhealthy convenient junk foods.
  7. Not drinking enough water: If you are training intensely at least 5 times per week, you may require up to or over a gallon of water per day.
  8. Not eating the correct proteins after training: Taking in a quick-absorbing protein source within 30 minutes of completing your workout will do wonders for your recovery.
  9. Skipping breakfast: Waking after a 6-8 hour fast, your body is screaming for nutrients, so it would behoove you to give it what it needs. A balanced meal of complex carbs, protein and some healthy fats will do the trick.
  10. Not staying consistent: the biggest mistake individuals make is not sticking to a plan.

HAPPY NEW YEAR, and good luck with your NEW YEAR’S PLAN!

Source:

10 Ways You Could Be Sabotaging Your Efforts to a Leaner, More Muscular Physique | FitOverFat.com.

Progress – 13 Mos. Post Big Chop

So, it’s been a couple months since I have blogged about my hair. I had been very frustrated with the progress the last couple of months. I see so many natural hair styles that I want to try, but my hair is not quite long enough to achieve. I went back to wearing my two-strand twists, which I am so tired of wearing. I had been afraid of trying a twist-out again because I work out so much and the moisture from sweating makes my hair frizz up ridiculously. But, for the last week I’ve been doing flat twist-outs and have been pleasantly surprised with the results. In the past, my twist-outs would turn into a frizzy twist-fro, and so I refused to try them again until now.

In the last six months, I have restrained myself from buying a bunch of new products. Most times, the products don’t actually do what they say they do, and I had been spending a lot of money unnecessarily. I just decided to learn to work with the products I had already bought. Many of them, I found to be OK, but a few just didn’t work for my texture. The ones that did not work got trashed. Finally, my bathroom cabinet shelves began to clear out, and much of the products I had been using were all gone or almost gone. Recently, I took a trip to the store to buy a few more new products. I’ve learned to buy the basics instead of something that says all these “wonderful” things on the label.

So, for the last week I’ve been using my new products to moisturize and set my hair at night. I still follow the LOC (leave-in conditioner, oil, cream) method, for the most part. I don’t always use leave-in conditioner everyday, as it tends to make my hair flaky. I do use a water/oil mix and my newest creme hair dress.

Here are the steps I take:

  1. Spritz my entire head with my water/oil mix. My staple oil is coconut oil.
  2. Spray entire head with argan/olive oil mix. I purchase argon oil and added olive oil once I go halfway through the bottle.
    argan oil/olive oil combo
  3. Spray entire head with Keratin spray.
    Keratin Therapy Treatment
  4. Apply Shea Butter Green Tea to hair, focusing on the ends.
    Shea Butter Green Tea
  5. Create 2-3 layers of short flat twists all over, applying Olive Oil Smooth & Hold pudding to the ends of the hair as you twist.
    Olive Oil Smooth-n-Hold Pudding

I also found that coiling the hair at the ends, as opposed to  twisting all the way to the end, helps minimize frizz when I take my twists a loose the next morning.  Here are the results:

Healthy Hair Care Tips for Children

Kid Curls: Healthy Hair Care Tips for Children

Reblogged from CURLYNIKKI
 

Do you have memories of sitting in between your mother’s legs while she parted your hair, oiled your scalp, and styled you up in some plaits and twists, perhaps with pretty clips and bubbles and elastics? Are those memories fond or fearful? For me, they’re all warm and fuzzy. Having my mom wash and braid me up for school was usually something I looked forward to – her hands were gentle, I loved the smell of the African Pride scalp oils she used (remember the yellow ones filled with petroleum and “herbs”?), and we had fun watching TV or talking while she got me ready for the next day of school.

I know that for others, the memories aren’t so sweet. Hair being scraped back and torn with rough combing, singes from irons used to “tame” naps, and harsh comments about how tough, nappy, and bad one’s hair was. I’ve seen the after-effects of negative treatment pass down much more visibly than the positive – mothers who were told their hair was “bad” have practiced the same with their own children, especially their daughters. Seeing 4 year olds with relaxed hair makes me sad. Hearing mothers talk about how terrible their child’s hair is in front of the child makes me cringe. I have heard Black women admit to choosing fathers of another race in order to ensure that her daughter didn’t have “nappy-ass hair” like she did. I’ve spoken with White mothers who have children with Black men, but have absolutely no clue what to do with their baby’s hair.
If you’re a parent struggling with your child’s hair, you aren’t alone! I’m no hair professional, but here are some tips I’ve acquired to help create more happy, healthy memories when it comes to little ones and their hair.

  • Moisturizing is the key: kids’ hair can get extremely dry. From wearing wool hats in the winter, to going to swimming lessons, to a general rough and tumble lifestyle, so many things can zap the moisture right out of your little one’s hair. If they also have tight kinks and curls, you’ll want to pay even more attention to this. Adding a bit of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) or jojoba oil to shampoos and conditioners is always a good move. Stick to water-based moisturizers to keep hair soft and supple in between washes and natural oils like coconut oil, argan oil, and shea butter to nourish and lubricate your child’s hair before styling.
  • Detangling doesn’t have to be torture: the keys to detangling are tools + technique. Use a wide-tooth comb to gently but thoroughly detangle hair section by section, and if you have extra time, use your fingers as a comb to remove any tiny knots or tangles. Never detangle your little one’s hair when it’s dry! The best time to do so is when their hair is soaking wet and full of conditioner – this helps your comb to move through the hair much easier, and less painfully too. If their hair does dry before you’ve been able to detangle, keep a spritz bottle of water and leave-in conditioner handy to wet the hair again before running through with the comb.
  • Young scalps are important: Are you concerned with the rate at which your child’s hair is NOT growing? It all starts at the scalp. School-aged children are prone to getting a little bit of everything in their hair, and if yours also sweats in their scalp, you’ll need to shampoo more frequently. Scalps need to be able to breathe in order for hair growth to flourish, so keep that in mind. Also – don’t gunk your child’s scalp with petroleum based oils and greases. While some use mineral oil-based products to protect their strands from mechanical damage, these products can sit on top of the scalp without providing any nourishing properties. Try applying castor oil to your little one’s scalp to nourish and promote growth.
  • Styles matter: Most parents I know limit “out” days and keep their children’s hair in mainly protective styles. Smart move, as this could save you the tears and extra time to detangle at the next wash day. In the same vein, don’t be afraid to try your hand at some new styles! Buns, braids, twists, cornrows – the options are endless! If you aren’t as skilled as you’d like to be, or if your busy schedule makes it hard to recreate fresh and fab styles, hit up your friendly neighborhood braider to get a style that may last your child a week or 2 at a time! Whatever route you take, remember that young hairlines are sensitive – don’t cause damage by braiding, pulling, or combing too tightly. Also, take care of exposed ends. Try applying shea butter or coconut oil to the ends of hair to protect from dryness and splitting.

(don’t the above tips reflect the same things we adults do for our natural hair care? Get the kiddies started off right!)

  • Watch your words: I have colleagues and acquaintances in their 50s who remember, clear as day, the way their mothers used to disparage and criticize their hair – those memories don’t easily fade away. Remove the negative speak when taking care of your child’s hair, and replace it with positives. Children first develop their self-esteem through what they’re taught and told at home – besides, there are sufficient messages in the world to tell your child why they aren’t good enough. Do you want to add to that, or help to strengthen your child against it? Use your words to instill pride and love in your child’s hair, so that they can absorb that pride and love for themselves. Instead of teaching them how to “fix” their hair, teach them how to take care of it. “Fixing” indicates that something is wrong – and as long as your child’s hair is healthy, it’ll be alright!
Looking for some more online resources to help with hair care for the Mini-Mes?
Check out Hair-Raising AdventuresBaby Big HairChocolate Hair, Vanilla Care, and the Curly Kids/Natural Kids tags on CurlyNikki
 
Below, share your tips for caring for your kiddo’s curls!

 

Whole Grain Muffin recipe

 

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